Strategic Pharmaceutical Competitive Intelligence

$995.00

Restructure your team for success by raising pharmaceutical competitive intelligence’s (CI) profile, developing strong reporting lines and claiming a role in the strategic decision-making process. CI team budgets have gradually increased since 2007, but many groups still withstand crippling cycles of expansions and cutbacks. Escape the resource roller coaster to secure budgets and staffing — and establish the value of CI within the larger organization. Along the way, build a culture of competitive intelligence that reaches across functions to collect and share critical information wherever it appears.

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Report Details

Publication Date: November 2010
Pages: 148
Chapters: 3
Metrics: 350+
Charts/Graphics: 90+

Top Reasons to Buy This Pharmaceutical Competitive Intelligence Report

Pharmaceutical competitive intelligence teams succeed when they’re visible, report to strategic planners and C-level executives and focus on pure CI-related activities. This study provides critical benchmarks to help your company.

Restructure the Competitive Intelligence Team for Success: Make sure your pharmaceutical competitive intelligence team does not stay buried in the organizational structure. Learn how to develop proper reporting lines and implement a more strategic organizational structure that will provide greater visibility and generate greater strategic impact.

Win Higher CI Budgets: Did you know that pharmaceutical competitive intelligence team budgets have gradually increased since 2007? Has yours? Learn why top-notch companies are funding competitive intelligence with greater investments year after year — and how they reap the benefits of their increasingly important teams.

Create a Competitive Intelligence Culture: Although competitive intelligence teams remain small, many companies do not rely solely on CI groups to do all the work. Learn how companies establish a culture of competitive intelligence to collect and share valuable information throughout the organization.

You may also be interested in CEIConnect: The Lifesciences Industry’s On-Demand Research Resource as well as our individual market intelligence research reports.

Excerpt from Strategic Pharmaceutical Competitive Intelligence

Though many companies understand the incredible strategic value and decision-support services that competitive intelligence teams provide, there is still a good percentage of companies, ranging from top-five pharmaceutical firms to small companies, that undervalue competitive intelligence. These companies bury competitive intelligence, keeping CI teams far away from the executives who guide corporate strategic decision making. They do not provide dedicated budgets or adequate staffing, which would allow CI groups to evolve to more sophisticated levels of service. These companies do not insulate their CI teams to protect them from the industry’s ebbs and flows, leading to the tearing down and rebuilding of CI in an unending cycle.

Table of Contents

9              Executive Summary

13           Profiled Companies

14           Methodology and Definitions

15           Pharmaceutical Competitive Intelligence: Five Principles for Success

22           Positioning Competitive Intelligence for Maximum Strategic Impact

24           The Strategic Benefits of Competitive Intelligence Teams’ Structures

46           Function-Specific Competitive Intelligence Teams

54           Balancing Internal Clients’ Needs with High-Level Corporate Goals

58           Competitive Intelligence Resources, Responsibilities and Tools

60           Resources for Collecting Competitive Intelligence

68           Competitive Intelligence Responsibilities and Analyses

87           Expanding the Competitive Intelligence Team’s Responsibilities

92           Competitive Intelligence Tools

102         Budgets, Staffing and Performance Measurement

105         Competitive Intelligence Budgets

120         Competitive Intelligence Staffing and Compensation

142         Performance Measurement

Charts and Graphics

Executive Summary

10           Figure E.1: Effectiveness Ratings of Current Competitive Intelligence Practices

16           Figure E.2: Rating Competitive Intelligence Challenges

17           Figure E.3: US Competitive Intelligence Budgets (2009 and 2010)

18           Figure E.4: European Competitive Intelligence Budgets (2009 and 2010)

19           Figure E.5: Other Functions that Collect Competitive Intelligence

Positioning Competitive Intelligence for Maximum Strategic Impact

The Strategic Benefits of Competitive Intelligence Teams’ Structures

24           Figure 1.1: Percentage of Companies With a Dedicated Competitive Intelligence Team in Place

29           Figure 1.2: Percentage of US CI Teams’ Time Dedicated to Work Performed for Specific Functions

29           Figure 1.3: Percentage of US CI Teams’ Time Dedicated to Work Performed for Specific Functions (By Company)

30           Figure 1.4: Percentage of European CI Teams’ Time Dedicated to Work Performed for Specific Functions (By Company)

31           Figure 1.5: Percentage of US CI Teams’ Time Dedicated to Work Performed for Specific Functions (Dedicated CI Teams)

31           Figure 1.6: Percentage of US CI Teams’ Time Dedicated to Work Performed for Specific Functions (Without Dedicated CI Teams)

32           Figure 1.7: Company 3’s Competitive Intelligence Structure

34           Figure 1.8: Number of Years Dedicated Competitive Intelligence Teams Have Been in Place

34           Figure 1.9: Level of Executive Leading Dedicated CI Teams

36           Figure 1.10: Company 8’s Competitive Intelligence Structure

38           Figure 1.11: Percentage of Companies Where Market Research Oversees CI (All Companies)

39           Figure 1.12: Percentage of Companies Where Market Research Oversees CI (Companies with Dedicated CI Teams)

39           Figure 1.13: Percentage of Companies Where Market Research Oversees CI (Companies without Dedicated CI Teams)

42           Figure 1.14: Company 2’s Former Market Research and Competitive Intelligence Structure Function-Specific Competitive Intelligence Teams

47           Figure 1.15: Company 4’s Competitive Intelligence Structure

Balancing Internal Clients’ Needs with High-Level Corporate Goals

54           Figure 1.16: Percentage of Competitive Intelligence Groups/Personnel that Perform Work for C-Level Executives (All Companies)

55           Figure 1.17: Percentage of Dedicated CI Groups that Perform Work for C-Level Executives

Competitive Intelligence Resources, Responsibilities and Tools

Resources for Collecting Competitive Intelligence

63           Figure 2.1: Other Functions that Collect Competitive Intelligence (All US)

64           Figure 2.2: Other Functions that Collect Competitive Intelligence (US with Dedicated Teams)

64           Figure 2.3: Other Functions that Collect Competitive Intelligence (US without Dedicated Teams)

65           Figure 2.4: Other Functions that Collect Competitive Intelligence (All Europe)

Competitive Intelligence Responsibilities and Analyses

69           Figure 2.5: Responsibilities of Competitive Intelligence (US with Dedicated CI Teams)

69           Figure 2.6: Responsibilities of Competitive Intelligence (US without Dedicated CI Teams)

70           Figure 2.7: Responsibilities of Competitive Intelligence (Europe)

71           Figure 2.8: Responsibilities of Competitive Intelligence (Europe Country-level)

73           Figure 2.9: Studies/Analyses Performed by Competitive Intelligence (US with Dedicated CI Teams)

73           Figure 2.10: Studies/Analyses Performed by Competitive Intelligence (US without Dedicated CI Teams)

74           Figure 2.11: Studies/Analyses Performed by Competitive Intelligence (Europe)

75           Figure 2.12: Studies/Analyses Performed by Competitive Intelligence (Europe Country-level)

76           Figure 2.13: Timeframe to Complete SWOT Analyses

77           Figure 2.14: Timeframe to Complete Porter’s 5-Forces Model

77           Figure 2.15: Timeframe to Complete Four Corners Analyses

78           Figure 2.16: Timeframe to Complete Competitor Benchmarking

78           Figure 2.17: Timeframe to Complete Competitor Modeling

79           Figure 2.18: Timeframe to Complete War Gaming

79           Figure 2.19: Timeframe to Complete Scenario Planning

80           Figure 2.20: Percentage of Companies that Rely on Competitive Intelligence for Designated Brand Tasks

(US Dedicated CI Teams)

81           Figure 2.21: Percentage of Companies that Rely on Competitive Intelligence for Designated Brand Tasks

(US without Dedicated CI Teams)

82           Figure 2.22: Percentage of Companies that Rely on Competitive Intelligence for Designated Brand Tasks

(Europe)

82           Figure 2.23: Percentage of Companies that Rely on Competitive Intelligence for Designated Brand Tasks

(Europe Country-level)

83           Figure 2.24: Phase in Which Competitive Intelligence Begins Supporting a Developing Brand (US)

85           Figure 2.25: Phase in Which Competitive Intelligence Begins Supporting a Developing Brand (Europe)

85           Figure 2.26: Phase in Which Competitive Intelligence Begins Supporting a Developing Brand (Europe Country-level)

Expanding the Competitive Intelligence Team’s Responsibilities

Competitive Intelligence Tools

93           Figure 2.27: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: Conventions and Meetings

94           Figure 2.28: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: Sales Team

94           Figure 2.29: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: MSL Teams

95           Figure 2.30: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: Internal Databases

96           Figure 2.31: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: Internet Portals

97           Figure 2.32: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: Syndicated Research

97           Figure 2.33: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: Direct (Face-to-Face) Interviews

98           Figure 2.34: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: Online Databases

99           Figure 2.35: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: Information from Government, Advocacy

Groups, Payer Reps

100         Figure 2.36: Timeframe to Start Using Tools and Techniques: Predictive Techniques

Budgets, Staffing and Performance Measurement

Competitive Intelligence Budgets

106         Figure 3.1: US Competitive Intelligence Budgets (2009 and 2010)

107         Figure 3.2: Items Covered by CI Budgets (US Companies with Dedicated CI Teams)

109         Figure 3.3: US Competitive Intelligence Budget Types (Companies with Dedicated CI Teams)

109         Figure 3.4: US Competitive Intelligence Budget Sources (Companies without Dedicated CI Teams)

111         Figure 3.5: Competitive Intelligence Funding Sources (US Companies with Dedicated CI Teams)

111         Figure 3.6: Competitive Intelligence Funding Sources (US Companies without Dedicated CI Teams)

112         Figure 3.7: Percentage of US CI Budget Outsourced

113         Figure 3.8: European Competitive Intelligence Budgets (2009 and 2010)

114         Figure 3.9: Items Covered by Competitive Intelligence Budgets (Europe)

115         Figure 3.10: European Competitive Intelligence Budget Sources

116         Figure 3.11: European Country-level Competitive Intelligence Budget Sources

117         Figure 3.12: Competitive Intelligence Funding Sources (Europe)

118         Figure 3.13: Percentage of European Competitive Intelligence Budget Outsourced

119         Figure 3.14: Percentages of Budget and Staffing Dedicated to Analysis of BRIC Countries

Competitive Intelligence Staffing and Compensation

121         Figure 3.15: US Competitive Intelligence Staffing (2009 and 2010)

123         Figure 3.16: European Competitive Intelligence Staffing (2009 and 2010)

124         Figure 3.17: European Country-level Competitive Intelligence Staffing (2009 and 2010)

125         Figure 3.18: Average Years of Experience of Typical CI Staff Member

126         Figure 3.19: Phase in Which Competitive Intelligence Begins Supporting a Developing Brand

127         Figure 3.20: US Competitive Intelligence Staffing Supporting Developing Products by Phase of Development

128         Figure 3.21: European Competitive Intelligence Staffing Supporting Developing Products by Phase of Development

129         Figure 3.22: Desired Experience When Hiring New Competitive Intelligence Personnel

130         Figure 3.23: Required Education Level of Competitive Intelligence New Hires

131         Figure 3.24: Most Desirable Educational Backgrounds for Competitive Intelligence New Hires

132         Figure 3.25: Traits Sought in Competitive Intelligence Professionals

133         Figure 3.26: Experienced Director Compensation

134         Figure 3.27: Newly Hired Director Compensation

135         Figure 3.28: Experienced Manager Compensation

136         Figure 3.29: Newly Hired Manager Compensation

137         Figure 3.30: Experienced Senior Analyst Compensation

138         Figure 3.31: Newly Hired Senior Analyst Compensation

139         Figure 3.32: Experienced Analyst Compensation

140         Figure 3.33: Newly Hired Analyst Compensation

141         Figure 3.34: Percentage of CI Employee Compensation that is Incentive or Bonus Compensation

Performance Measurement

143         Figure 3.35: Performance Measurement Methodology (US with Dedicated CI)

143         Figure 3.36: Performance Measurement Methodology (US without Dedicated CI)

144         Figure 3.37: Performance Measurement Methodology (Europe)

144         Figure 3.38: Performance Measurement Methodology (Europe Country-Level)