Promotional Speaker Programs

Successfully Managing Speaker Bureaus and Recruiting Thought Leaders

Promotional Speaker Programs

$995.00

Boost the impact of your promotional speaker programs with this study’s detailed metrics on team structure, speaker recruitment and compensation, performance metrics and emerging trends. Ten real-world team profiles provide examples of effective promotional speaker program organization. As program attendance relies on audiences’ needs and schedules, leverage traditional live speaker events, such as podium-style presentations and round-table discussions, alongside one-way and interactive webcasts that “preserve” presentations to enable more flexibility. Learn top-performing companies’ strategies for demonstrating program value through soft metrics rather than sales data. Finally, in light of the pending Sunshine Act, ready compliance teams for growing opportunities online and identify and mitigate critical challenges that will arise.

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REPORT HIGHLIGHTS

 

Promotional Speaker Programs: Successfully Managing Speaker Bureaus and Recruiting Thought Leaders

  • Publication Date: March 2013
  • Pages: 207
  • Chapters: 5
  • Metrics: 500+
  • Charts/Graphics: 175+

Data split by company type:

  • Top 10 pharma
  • Top 50 pharma
  • Small pharma
  • Medical device company
Report Features

Boost the impact of your promotional speaker programs with this study’s detailed metrics — including team structure, speaker recruitment and compensation, performance metrics and emerging trends. Diversify promotional speaker events to drive attendance and expand program reach. Measure speaker program success and demonstrate value. Ensure a seamless transition to the Sunshine Act.

Reason to Buy

This report and its sister study, Educational Speaker Programs: Medical Event Management and Recruitment in a Complex Regulatory Environment, explore the full array of pharmaceutical speaker events. Whereas Educational Speaker Programs details speaker events associated with medical affairs teams and medical education, this report focuses on marketing team goals. Though similar, these speaker programs — and the teams that drive them — differ in structure, event management protocol, funding and even governing regulations.

Target Audience

Pharmaceutical and medical device executives, directors, and managers involved in the following areas should consider purchasing this report:
– Speaker programs management
– Speaker bureau management
– Product marketing teams
– Drug launch teams
– Legal teams
– Lifecycle management
– Brand managers
– Account supervisors
– Clinical Development
– Medical Affairs

Chapter Example

Few areas of the pharmaceutical industry receive as much public scrutiny as promotional speaker programs. In the public eye, doctors who are paid to promote a product at an event are then biased in favor of that product. Some people fear that instead of prescribing treatments based on cost-effectiveness and clinically proven data, physicians make prescription choices in favor of the products they represent.

This fear was evident in the public attention that ProPublica’s Dollars for Docs program received. The program published speaking fees for doctors who speak on behalf of 12 companies’ products. Dollars for Docs showed that some companies had paid millions of dollars in speaking fees between 2009 and 2011 — a situation not understood by the public when many physicians are already perceived as drug pushers. And while honorarium does not equate scripts, it obviously influences them — otherwise, companies would not use speaking events. Because of this scrutiny in the past few years, uncertainty surrounded speaker programs — the effects of which resulted in falling speaker bureau budgets a few years ago and physicians’ hesitancy to speak for life science companies.