Patient Centricity 2.0 (Marketing)

$4,895.00

Patient-centricity is more than a buzzword — it’s the new way of life for leading life sciences companies.  This report investigates how companies are implementing structures, resources and tactics to best support patient-centric strategies.  It also explores different types of patient-centric initiatives — including resources, timelines and ROI — to provide readers with snapshots of different programs they can conduct to bring their company’s patient-centricity to the next level.

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Report Details

Patient-Centricity means that companies engage with actual drug/device end-users (aka patients/consumers/humans)! They listen to patient concerns about things like quality of life, dosage, delivery, side effects (diet issues, weight gain, etc), and anything else that affects real people. They engage with patient communities and work with them to ensure that patients have the knowledge, resources and support systems they need. This report’s three chapters are about these topics:

  • Chapter 1 is about the prevalence of patient-centric initiatives and the rise of dedicated teams.
  • Chapter 2 is about roles/responsibilities for patient-centric programs and distribution channels.
  • Chapter 3 has profiles of specific patient-centric initiatives.

Data have been split by by geography:

  • Global
  • US
  • EU/CAN/AUS
  • Asia-Pacific
  • Latin America
  • Middle East and Africa

Data have also been split by company size:

  •  Top 10 pharma
  • Top 50 pharma
  • Small pharma
  • Device
  • Consultant / CRO

Top Reasons to Buy Patient-Centricity 2.0

Gain awareness of and improve strategy and planning initiatives for patient-centricity: Improving strategy and planning is essential to maximizing patient-centric initiatives’ impact. Proper planning enables teams to deliver the information or service that patients need most, determine the most effective way to solve this need and discover the best way to communicate the solution to patients. This study includes detailed best practices and strategies for balancing patient needs with internal commercial priorities. It also includes methods companies use to identify and communicate initiatives for patient-centricity.

Determine best-fit structures for disseminating patient-centric messages: Teams weigh several factors when deciding the best path for distributing messages for patient-centricity. Online platforms are being used as a primary point of communication. But within the online sphere there are several approaches that teams can use. This study explores online channels used to engage patients, as well as the percentage of companies using those platforms.

Benchmark patient-centric initiative costs, staffing and duration to plot successful initiatives and ensure adequate support: Every initiative for patient-centricity will be slightly different in operations, strategy and resources. Companies need to consider these details before they can successfully implement patient-centric activities. The data in this study provide initiative details, company backgrounds, initiative spending and other resource metrics to help pharmaceutical and medical device teams implement and plan their patient-centric tactics.

You may also be interested in CEIConnect: The Lifesciences Industry’s On-Demand Research Resource as well as our individual marketing research reports.

The Following Excerpt is from Chaper 3: Profiling Patient-Centric Initiatives

Patient-centric initiatives can start almost any time after a product is approaching launch. Early initiatives — like those that take place a year or two prior to launch — can help new patients acclimate to the product (especially for first-in-class products). Moreover, physicians and payers may look more favorably on new products if the company promises patient support.

That being said, initiatives that begin late in a product’s lifecycle are also crucial. New initiatives may help sway patients to the company’s product as competitors enter the market. Alternatively, they may help long-term product users remain motivated and maintain product adherence.

Eighteen percent of surveyed teams’ initiatives began a year before the related product launched, and another 36% began during the product’s launch year (Figure 3.5, not shown). While launch may be the most popular time to start an initiative, 27% of surveyed teams’ initiatives did not begin until the product had been on market for at least two years. More specifically, one initiative began during the product’s 4th year on market, and another did not begin until the product’s 10th year on market.

Surveyed teams also indicated the expected duration of their initiatives (Figure 3.6, not shown). Only 3% of surveyed teams’ initiatives lasted less than a year. Short-term campaigns like these may need to have very targeted and achievable end goals because most initiatives would require more time to reach all of their audience and make an impact. Instead, 41% last 1–2 years. This duration is long enough to build trust with patients and help them develop habits. Yet it is not long enough that the company would have to implement processes and/or staff to establish long-term maintenance.

Examples of Companies that Have Participated in this Study:

ph222-participation-list

Table of Contents

7             Executive Summary

18           Emerging Patient-Centric Ideals and Dedicated Teams

19           Defining Patient-Centricity Within Life Science Organizations

38           Implementing and Resourcing Dedicated Patient-Centric Functions

45           Obstacles and Emerging Trends in Patient-Centricity

50           Patient-Centric Program Management and Distribution Channels

51           Coordinating Responsibilities for Patient-Centric Initiatives

65           Balancing Patient Needs wIth Internal Commercial Priorities

79           Profiling Patient-Centric Initiatives

80           Patient-Centric Initiative Aggregated Data

98           Patient-Centric Initiative Profiles

7             Executive Summary

10           Figure E.1: Presence of Dedicated Patient-Centric Teams, by Geography

12           Figure E.2: Functional Involvement in Developing Patient-Centric Attitudes, by Company Size

13           Figure E.3: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Dedicated Groups

15           Figure E.4: Level of ROI for Specific Patient-Centric Distribution Channels

18           Emerging Patient-Centric Ideals and Dedicated Teams

19           Defining Patient-Centricity Within Life Science Organizations

22           Figure 1.1: Collecting the “Patient Voice” to Influence New Pharmaceutical Brand Marketing Tactics

25           Figure 1.2: Organizational Approach to Patient-Centricity: All Companies

27           Figure 1.3: Organizational Approach to Patient-Centricity: By Geography

27           Figure 1.4: Organizational Approach to Patient-Centricity: By Company Size

29           Figure 1.5: Effectiveness Rankings of Communicating and Implementing Patient-Centric Ideals, by Geography

30           Figure 1.6: Effectiveness Rankings of Communicating and Implementing Patient-Centric Ideals, by Company Size

33           Figure 1.7: Functional Involvement in Developing Patient-Centric Attitudes: Global Teams

33           Figure 1.8: Functional Involvement in Developing Patient-Centric Attitudes: US Teams

34           Figure 1.9: Functional Involvement in Developing Patient-Centric Attitudes: EU, Canada and Australia

35           Figure 1.10: Functional Involvement in Developing Patient-Centric Attitudes: Rest-of-World

37           Figure 1.11: Functional Involvement in Developing Patient-Centric Attitudes, by Company Size

38           Figure 1.12: Presence of Dedicated Patient-Centric Teams, by Geography

38           Implementing and Resourcing Dedicated Patient-Centric Functions

39           Figure 1.13: Age of Dedicated Patient-Centric Teams

40           Figure 1.14: Structural Organization of Patient-Centric Teams

41           Figure 1.15: Executive Level Directly Responsible for Patient-Centric Teams

42           Figure 1.16: Patient-Centric Team Staffing, by Company: 2014

43           Figure 1.17: Patient-Centric Team Staffing, by Company: 2015

43           Figure 1.18: Patient-Centric Team Staffing, by Company: 2016

44           Figure 1.19: Percentage of Staffing Increase for Patient-Centric Teams, by Company

45           Obstacles and Emerging Trends in Patient-Centricity

47           Figure 1.20: Challenges Facing Patient-Centricity

49           Figure 1.21: Emerging Trends in Patient-Centricity

50           Patient-Centric Program Distribution and Responsibilities

51           Coordinating Responsibilities for Patient-Centric Initiatives

52           Figure 2.1: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Dedicated Groups

52           Figure 2.2: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Company Type: Dedicated Groups

53           Figure 2.3: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Marketing Umbrella

54           Figure 2.4: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Company Type: Marketing Umbrella

55           Figure 2.5: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Brand Team

55           Figure 2.6: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Company Type: Brand Team

56           Figure 2.7: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: New Product Planning Team

57           Figure 2.8: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Company Type: New Product Planning Team

58           Figure 2.9: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Market Access Team

59           Figure 2.10: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Company Type: Market Access Team

59           Figure 2.11: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Corporate Communications Team

60           Figure 2.12: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Company Type: Corporate Communications Team

60           Figure 2.13: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Legal / Regulatory Affairs Team

61           Figure 2.14: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Company Type: Legal / Regulatory Affairs

62           Figure 2.15: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Medical Affairs Team

63           Figure 2.16: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Company Type: Medical Affairs Team

63           Figure 2.17: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Clinical Development/ R&D Team

64           Figure 2.18: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Company Type: Clinical / R&D Team

64           Figure 2.19: Scope of Responsibility for Patient-Centric Activities, by Geography: Third-Party Vendors or CROs

65           Balancing Patient Needs with Internal Commercial Priorities

66           Figure 2.20: Patient-Centric Initiatives Used, by Geography

67           Figure 2.21: Patient-Centric Initiatives Used, by Company Type

68           Figure 2.22: Distribution Channels Used for Specific Initiative Types: Rewards Programs

69           Figure 2.23: Distribution Channels Used for Specific Initiative Types: Product Information

69           Figure 2.24: Distribution Channels Used for Specific Initiative Types: Financial Assistance

70           Figure 2.25: Distribution Channels Used for Specific Initiative Types: Measurement and Tracking

70           Figure 2.26: Distribution Channels Used for Specific Initiative Types: Remote or Digital Patient Support  Forums

71           Figure 2.27: Distribution Channels Used for Specific Initiative Types: Physician Referrals

71           Figure 2.28: Distribution Channels Used for Specific Initiative Types: Lifestyle Coaching

72           Figure 2.29: Reported ROI for General Patient-Centric Initiatives, by Geography

74           Figure 2.30: Level of ROI for Specific Patient-Centric Distribution Channels

75           Table 2.30: ROI Measurements Used in Specific Patient-Centric Initiative Types

76           Figure 2.31: Presence of Dedicated Patient-Centric or Innovation Funding

77           Figure 2.32: Criteria for Distributing Patient-Centric or Innovation Funding

78           Figure 2.33: Level of Dedicated Patient-Centric or Innovation Funding, by Company

79           Profiling Patient-Centric Initiatives

80           Patient-Centric Initiative Aggregated Data

81           Figure 3.1: Percentage of Branded versus Unbranded Patient-Centric Initiatives: All Initiatives

82           Figure 3.2: Annual Revenue of Brands Supported by Patient-Centric Initiatives

84           Figure 3.3: Percentage of Patient-Centric Initiatives Dedicated to Specific Objectives

86           Figure 3.4: Percentage of Patient-Centric Initiatives Using Specific Channels

87           Figure 3.5: Start Time for Patient-Centric Initiatives

88           Figure 3.6: Duration of Patient-Centric Initiatives

90           Figure 3.7: Functions Involved with Patient-Centric Initiatives

92           Figure 3.8: Expected Return on Investment for Patient-Centric Initiatives

94           Figure 3.9: Number of FTEs Dedicated to Patient-Centric Initiatives, by Company

95           Figure 3.10: Duration of Patient-Centric Planning and Support, by Company

97           Figure 3.11: Cost of Supporting Patient-Centric Initiative Planning and Support, by Company

98           Patient-Centric Initiative Profiles

99           Figure 3.12: Company 5: Initiative Background

100         Figure 3.13: Company 5: Initiative Details

101         Figure 3.14: Company 5: Initiative Resources

102         Figure 3.15: Company 5: Initiative Success

103         Figure 3.16: Company 18: Initiative Background

104         Figure 3.17: Company 18: Initiative Details

105         Figure 3.18: Company 18: Initiative Resources

106         Figure 3.19: Company 18: Initiative Success

107         Figure 3.20: Company 19: Initiative Background

108         Figure 3.21: Company 19: Initiative Details

109         Figure 3.22: Company 19: Initiative Resources

110         Figure 3.23: Company 19: Initiative Success

111         Figure 3.24: Company 28: Initiative Background

112         Figure 3.25: Company 28: Initiative Details

113         Figure 3.26: Company 28: Initiative Resources

114         Figure 3.27: Company 28: Initiative Success

115         Figure 3.28: Company 32: Initiative Background

116         Figure 3.29: Company 32: Initiative Details

117         Figure 3.30: Company 32: Initiative Resources

118         Figure 3.31: Company 32: Initiative Success

119         Figure 3.32: Company 45: Initiative Background

120         Figure 3.33: Company 45: Initiative Details

121         Figure 3.34: Company 45: Initiative Resources

122         Figure 3.35: Company 45: Initiative Success

123         Figure 3.36: Company 52: Initiative Background

124         Figure 3.37: Company 52: Initiative Details

125         Figure 3.38: Company 52: Initiative Resources

126         Figure 3.39: Company 52: Initiative Success

127         Figure 3.40: Company 60: Initiative Background

128         Figure 3.41: Company 60: Initiative Details

129         Figure 3.42: Company 60: Initiative Resources

130         Figure 3.43: Company 60: Initiative Success

131         Figure 3.44: Company 63: Initiative Background

132         Figure 3.45: Company 63: Initiative Details

133         Figure 3.46: Company 63: Initiative Resources

134         Figure 3.47: Company 63: Initiative Success