Managed Markets Account Managers

$3,495.00

In today’s reimbursement-driven landscape, the managed markets account manager proves value by conveying critical drug data to payers. Successful managed markets groups work closely with other internal functions — including clinical, market access and medical affairs — to develop and deliver a consistent product value story. Use this report to establish a team that builds strong payer relationships and addresses their needs as they seek substantial value dossiers. Distribute resources and account managers’ focus between national and regional accounts more effectively — and hire the ideal managed markets account managers in terms of professional/educational experiences and background.

Download a benchmarking report summarySpeak to a pharmaceutical benchmarking expert

Report Details

Publication Date: May 2014
Pages: 115
Chapters: 3
Metrics: 500+
Charts/Graphics: 83

Top Reasons to Buy This Managed Markets Account Manager Report

Improve Payer Meeting Outcomes: Successful meetings between payers and account managers are often the deciding factor in earning formulary status for a product.  This report outlines a “game plan” to prepare for and enter payer meetings.  It details the types of meetings account managers have with payers, as well as their frequency and duration.  The payer’s contact person will often affect the type of message that account managers present.  Companies must plan ahead to tailor each meeting to their clients’ priorities.  Above all, the best practices and insights contained in the study show how account managers focus on the depth of content in each meeting so that they offer robust data and instill payer confidence.

Establish a Surefire Approach to Building Payer Relationships: Personalized presentations are the single-most successful method to building strong payer relationships.  Account managers who can first identify and then address individual payer needs will show their clients that they understand the payer’s interests and priorities. This report includes benchmarks on when managed markets account managers should begin to talk to payers about new products.  It also explores best practices that managed markets account managers employ to unify outbound messages to key customer groups.

Support Account Managers with Scientific Expertise:The research conducted for this study found that 71% of companies support their managed markets account managers with field-based liaison teams.  In many cases, companies also employ health outcomes liaisons or managed care liaisons to provide scientific support to the value dossier presentation.  This study illustrates the value of incorporating MSLs and other scientific experts to support account managers and even present scientific data directly to payers.

You may also be interested in our market access library as well as our individual market access research reports.

Excerpt from Managed Market Account Managers

In response to payers’ increased pressure on pharmaceutical and medical device prices, the pharma industry is spending more money on comparative effectiveness research (CER) and health economics studies. Pharma is leveraging this research to bolster the value proposition for new drugs and therapies. However, simply developing these materials is not enough. An effective and efficient infrastructure also needs to be in place to convey this information to payers.

Successful managed markets groups work closely with other internal groups —
including clinical, market access and medical affairs. This collaboration serves to ensure that a consistent message, one that justifies current prices and presents new products’ value to payers, is coming from the company. A key component of developing and delivering this message is the account managers who face payers and hospitals to make the proposition directly to formulary managers. As one interviewed managed markets director described his role, “We protect profitability. Sales teams have to generate the orders. I make sure we sell the product at a price that is profitable.”

Table of Contents

7              Executive Summary

22           Driving Managed Markets Account Management Success Via Structure and Resources

23           Considering Company Needs and Expectations to Build Successful US Managed Markets Account Management Groups

32           Staffing US Managed Markets Groups to Reach Out to Key Payers

42           Structuring and Resourcing Ex-US Managed Markets Account Management Groups

49           Achieving Formulary Status by Improving Payer Relationship Management

86           Improving Account Management Planning in EU and Emerging Markets

93           Deploying Superior Account Managers Via Intelligent Support, Account Allocation and Compensation

97           Identifying and Compensating Managed Markets Account Managers

109         Providing Account Managers with Clinical and Scientific Expertise

Charts and Graphics

7              Executive Summary

14           Figure E.1: Percentage of Time Spent Planning and Strategizing Versus Time Spent Meeting with Targets: US Managed Markets Teams

16           Figure E.2: Timeline of Managed Markets and Account Manager Involvement in Product Development, by Phase

18           Figure E.3: Percentage of US Companies Using Scientific/Clinical Experts to Support Managed Markets Account Managers

21           Figure E.4: Number of Managed Markets Account Managers and Supported Products, by Company

21           Figure E.5: Managed Markets Account Manager Group Annual Spending, by Company and Geography

22           Driving Managed Markets Account Management Success Via Structure and Resources

23           Considering Company Needs and Expectations to Build Successful US Managed Markets Account Management Groups

26           Figure 1.1: Direct Supervisor for US Managed Markets Account Managers, by Management Level

27           Figure 1.2: Second-Tier Oversight of US Managed Markets Account Manager Activities, by Management Level

28           Figure 1.3: Ultimate Responsibility for All US Managed Markets Account Managers, by Management Level

29           Figure 1.4: Ultimate Responsibility for All US Managed Markets Account Managers, by Position Type

30           Figure 1.5: Managed Markets Account Manager Reporting Lines: Company A (Small Company)

31           Figure 1.6: Managed Markets Account Manager Reporting Lines: Company B (Top 50 Company)

32           Staffing US Managed Markets Groups to Reach Out to Key Payers

33           Figure 1.7: Number of Managed Markets Account Managers at US Groups: Top 50 Companies

34           Figure 1.8: Number of Managed Markets Account Managers at US Groups: Small Companies

36           Figure 1.9: Average Number of Managed Markets Account Managers at US Groups, by Account Manager Type

37           Figure 1.10: Number of Managed Markets Account Managers at US Groups, by Account Manager Type: Top 50 Companies

38           Figure 1.11: Number of Managed Markets Account Managers at US Groups, by Account Manager Type: Small Companies

40           Figure 1.12: Total Managed Markets Account Manager Spending for US Groups, by Company

41           Figure 1.13: Managed Markets Account Manager Spending for US Groups, by Activity

42           Structuring and Resourcing Ex-US Managed Markets Account Management Groups

43           Figure 1.14: Direct Supervisor for Ex-US Managed Markets Account Managers, by Management Level

44           Figure 1.15: Oversight of Ex-US Managed Markets Account Managers Activities, by Management Level

45           Figure 1.16: Oversight of All Ex-US Managed Markets Account Managers, by Management Level

47           Figure 1.17: Total Managed Markets Account Manager Spending for Ex-US Groups, by Company

48           Figure 1.18: Managed Markets Account Manager Spending for Ex-US Groups, by Activity

49           Achieving Formulary Status by Improving Payer Relationship Management

52           Figure 2.1: Contact Person for US Private Payers

52           Figure 2.2: Contact Person for US Government Payers

53           Figure 2.3: Contact Person for US Hospital Systems

56           Figure 2.4: Average Number of Meetings Managed Markets Teams Have with Payers per Month, by US Payer Type

57           Figure 2.5: Number of Meetings Managed Markets Teams Have with US National Private Payers per Month

58           Figure 2.6: Number of Meetings Managed Markets Teams Have with US National Government Payers per Month

59           Figure 2.7: Number of Meetings Managed Markets Teams Have with US Regional Private Payers per Month

59           Figure 2.8: Number of Meetings Managed Markets Teams Have with US Regional Government Payers per Month

60           Figure 2.9: Number of Meetings Managed Markets Teams Have with US Hospital Systems per Month

61           Figure 2.10: Number of Meetings Managed Markets Teams Have with US HMOs per Month

62           Figure 2.11: Average Frequency and Duration of Managed Markets Teams’ Meetings with Payers, by US Payer Type

63           Figure 2.12: Frequency and Duration of Managed Markets Teams’ Meetings with US National Private Payers

64           Figure 2.13: Frequency and Duration of Managed Markets Teams’ Meetings with US National Government Payers

65           Figure 2.14: Frequency and Duration of Managed Markets Teams’ Meetings with US Regional Private Payers

66           Figure 2.15: Frequency and Duration of Managed Markets Teams’ Meetings with US Regional Government Payers

66           Figure 2.16: Frequency and Duration of Managed Markets Teams’ Meetings with US HMOs

67           Figure 2.17: Frequency and Duration of Managed Markets Teams’ Meetings with US Hospital Systems

71           Figure 2.18: Percentage of Time Spent on Managed Markets Activities: US Teams

72           Figure 2.19: Percentage of Time Spent Planning and Strategizing Versus Time Spent Meeting with Targets: US Managed Markets Teams

73           Figure 2.20: Percentage of Time Spent Traveling: US Managed Markets Teams

74           Figure 2.21: Percentage of Time Spent Attending Conferences: US Managed Markets Teams

74           Figure 2.22: Percentage of Time Spent Training/Monitoring: US Managed Markets Teams

75           Figure 2.23: Percentage of Time Spent on Administrative Tasks: US Managed Markets Teams

75           Figure 2.24: Percentage of Time Spent on Managed Markets Activities, by Company: US Top 50

76           Figure 2.25: Percentage of Time Spent on Managed Markets Activities, by Company: US Small Companies

78           Figure 2.26: Company 1 Profile

79           Figure 2.27: Company 1 Profile, Cont.

80           Figure 2.28: Company 4 Profile

81           Figure 2.29: Company 4 Profile, Cont.

82           Figure 2.30: Company 6 Profile

83           Figure 2.31: Company 6 Profile, Cont.

84           Figure 2.32: Company 8 Profile

85           Figure 2.33: Company 8 Profile, Cont.

86           Figure 2.34: Percentage of Time Spent Planning and Strategizing Versus Meeting with Targets:  EU and EM Managed Markets Teams

86           Improving Account Management Planning in EU and Emerging Markets

87           Figure 2.35: Percentage of Time Spent Traveling: EU and EM Managed Markets Teams

88           Figure 2.36: Percentage of Time Spent Attending Conferences: EU and EM Managed Markets Teams

88           Figure 2.37:

88           Percentage of Time Spent on Administrative Tasks: EU and EM Managed Markets Teams

89           Figure 2.38: Percentage of Time Spent Training/Monitoring: EU and EM Managed Markets Teams

89           Figure 2.39: Percentage of Time Spent on Managed Markets Activities, by Company: EU and EM Teams

91           Figure 2.40: Company 11 Profile

92           Figure 2.41: Company 11 Profile, Cont.

93           Deploying Superior Account Managers Via Intelligent Support, Account Allocation and Compensation

94           Figure 3.1: Phase in Which Company Begins Communicating with Payers About New Product

95           Figure 3.2: Phase in Which Managed Markets Account Managers Begin Communicating with Payers About New Product

96           Figure 3.3: Phase in Which Managed Markets Account Managers Stop Communicating with Payers About New Product

97           Identifying and Compensating Managed Markets Account Managers

98           Figure 3.4: Preferred Professional Background for Managed Markets Account Managers: US Groups

98           Figure 3.5: Preferred Educational Background for Managed Markets Account Managers: US Groups

99           Figure 3.6: Annual Compensation Amounts for National-Level Managed Markets Account Managers: US Groups

100         Figure 3.7: Annual Compensation Amounts for Regional-Level Managed Markets Account Managers: US Groups

101         Figure 3.8: Average Number of Accounts and Account Managers, by US Payer Type

102         Figure 3.9: Number of Accounts and Account Managers: US National Private Payers

103         Figure 3.10: Number of Accounts and Account Managers: US Regional Private Payers

105         Figure 3.11: Number of Accounts and Account Managers: US National Government Payers

105         Figure 3.12: Number of Accounts and Account Managers: US Regional Government Payers

106         Figure 3.13: Number of Accounts and Account Managers: US Hospital Systems

107         Figure 3.14: Number of Accounts and Account Managers: US HMOs

108         Figure 3.15: Number of Managed Markets Accounts: EU and EM Teams

109         Figure 3.16: Percentage of US Companies Using Scientific/Clinical Experts to Support Managed Markets Account Managers

109         Providing Account Managers with Clinical and Scientific Expertise

110         Figure 3.17: Number of MSLs Among US Managed Markets Groups, by Company

111         Figure 3.18: Percentage of MSL Time Spent Supporting Managed Markets Account Managers, by Company

111         Figure 3.19: Number of HOLs Among US Managed Markets Groups, by Company

112         Figure 3.20: Number of MCLs Among US Managed Markets Groups, by Company

114         Figure 3.21: Average Number of Times per Quarter Account Managers Call on Scientific/Medical Expertise, by Type of Contact with Target

114         Figure 3.22: Number of Times per Quarter Account Managers Call on Scientific/Medical Expertise for Face-to-Face Meetings with Target

115         Figure 3.23: Number of Times per Quarter Account Managers Call on Scientific/Medical Expertise for Online Interactions with Target

115         Figure 3.24: Number of Times per Quarter Account Managers Call on Scientific/Medical Expertise for Phone Conversations with Target