Health Outcomes Liaison and Managed Care Liaison Teams

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This report contains benchmarks and best practices for the management of existing health outcomes liaison (HOL) teams and the development of new ones. Metrics explore team resources and infrastructure as well as health outcomes liaison activity levels and payer interactions. Use the findings to compare team sizes and ratios (commercial account rep-to-HOL and field manager-to-HOL) to determine ideal staffing numbers and budget allocation. Explore timelines to determine the right time for health outcome liaison brand support, and discover how top companies align messages across teams and coordinate health payer liaisons with other field forces to deliver a strong product story.

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Report Details

Publication Date: July 2013
Pages: 120
Chapters: 3
Metrics: 500+
Charts/Graphics: 87

Top Reasons to Buy This Health Outcomes Liaison Report

Right-size and position your HOL team to maximize impact: Examine real-company structures and see why many leading companies place HOLs under the medical affairs structure. Compare team sizes and ratios (commercial account rep-to-HOL and field manager-to-HOL metrics) to determine ideal staffing numbers and budget allocation.

Assemble an HOL team with superior skills and diverse experience: Find the right mix of educational and healthcare experience and competitive compensation to attract and retain high-caliber liaisons at different levels. Equip these new hires — and support ongoing personnel development — with well-designed training programs.

Strengthen payer relationships and build a convincing product dossier: Compare benchmarks and rankings to see how often — and with which tools — teams should communicate with payers. Explore timelines to determine the right time for HOL brand support and ensure the best use of resources. Discover how top companies align messages across teams and coordinate HOLs with other field forces to deliver a strong product story.

You may also be interested in our market access library as well as our individual market access research reports.

Excerpt from Health Outcomes Liaison

Ever-increasing competition creates more and more treatment choices for patients and their insurance payers. Payers’ reimbursement options often shape patients’ medicine choices. With so many choices available to patients and payers, pharmaceutical companies trying to squeeze revenue out of their products know that they must earn top-tier reimbursement status to even have the possibility of reaching their financial goals.

Simultaneously, payers are being forced to reduce healthcare costs in the US and worldwide. These pressures makes it even more difficult, particularly for newer products with higher costs, to earn spots on formularies. Until recently, strong clinical results and health outcomes data were sufficient to win drugs’ spots on formularies. Today, however, payer organizations want to see more. Comparative data and budget modeling are essential to convincing payers to opt for one drug over another. New drugs must be better than other treatments, both in showing clinical efficacy and in reducing long-term costs.

Table of Contents

7              Executive Summary

10           Study Methodology

11           Study Definitions

12           Health Outcomes Liaisons: Five Principles for Success

22           Pinpointing HOL Team Alignment and Resource Allocation

26           HOL Team Structures

38           HOL Team Staffing

46           HOL Team Budgets

57           HOL Brand Support, Payer Interactions and Coordination with Other Field Forces

58           HOL Brand Support

68           Payer Interactions

87           Working with Other Field Forces

91           Building an HOL Team Through Targeted Hiring and Training

95           HOL Hiring and Training

115         Launching New HOL Teams to Meet Payer Demands

Charts and Graphics

7             Executive Summary

10           Study Methodology

11           Study Definitions

12           Health Outcomes Liaisons: Five Principles for Success

13           Figure E.1: HOL Team Placement Within Organizations (US)

15           Figure E.2: Companies’ Ideal Education Levels for HOL Hires (US)

16           Figure E.3: Ideal Job Experience of HOL New Hires (US)

17           Figure E.4: Average Effectiveness Ratings of Tools Used in Payer Conversations (US): Small   Molecule Drugs

18           Figure E.5: Average Effectiveness Ratings of Tools Used in Payer Conversations (Canada and UK)

19           Figure E.6: Percentage of HOL Teams Supporting Products at Different Lifecycle Stages (US)

20           Figure E.7: Number of HOLs (US)

21           Figure E.8: Average Number of Face-to-Face Visits by an HOL per Quarter (US)

22           Figure 1.1: Age of HOL Teams (US): All Companies

22           Pinpointing HOL Team Alignment and Resource Allocation

23           Figure 1.2: Age of HOL Teams (US): Top 10 Companies

23           Figure 1.3: Age of HOL Teams (US): Top 20 Companies

24           Figure 1.4: Age of HOL Teams (US): Small Companies

24           Figure 1.5: Age of HOL Teams (Canada and UK)

26           Figure 1.6: HOL Team Placement Within Organizations (US)

26           HOL Team Structures

28           Figure 1.7: HOL Team Placement Within Organizations (Canada and UK)

29           Table 1.1: Positions to Which Surveyed Companies’ HOLs Report Directly

30           Table 1.2: Position to Which Leader of HOL Team Reports

31           Figure 1.8: HOL Team Alignment (US)

32           Figure 1.9: HOL Team Alignment (Canada and UK)

34           Figure 1.10: Team Structure: Company F

35           Figure 1.11: Team Structure: Company A

36           Figure 1.12: Team Structure: Company C

37           Figure 1.13: Team Structure: Company H

38           Figure 1.14: Number of HOLs (US): All Companies

38           HOL Team Staffing

39           Figure 1.15: Number of HOLs (US): Top 10 Companies

40           Figure 1.16: Number of HOLs (US): Top 20 Companies

40           Figure 1.17: Number of HOLs (US): Small Companies

42           Figure 1.18: Average Number of HOLs, by Company Size (US): 2011 and 2013

43           Figure 1.19: Number of HOLs (Canada and UK)

46           Figure 1.20: HOL Team Annual Budget (US)

46           HOL Team Budgets

47           Figure 1.21: HOL Budget Allocation, by Company (US)

48           Figure 1.22: Real-Dollar HOL Budget Allocations, by Activity (US)

49           Figure 1.23: Average HOL Budget Allocation (US)

50           Figure 1.24: Average HOL Budget Allocation (US): Removing Companies 9, 10, 20

51           Figure 1.25: Average HOL Budget Allocation (US): Companies 9, 10, 20 Only

52           Figure 1.26: Average Cost per HOL, by Company (US)

53           Figure 1.27: HOL Team Annual Budget (Canada and UK)

54           Figure 1.28: HOL Budget Allocation, by Company (Canada and UK)

55           Figure 1.29: Real-Dollar HOL Budget Allocation, by Company (Canada and UK)

56           Figure 1.30: Average Cost per HOL, by Company (Canada and UK)

57           HOL Brand Support, Payer Interactions and Coordination with Other Field Forces

58           HOL Brand Support

59           Figure 2.1: Stage at Which HOL Teams Begin Supporting a Product (US)

60           Figure 2.2: Stage at Which HOL Teams Stop Supporting a Drug (US)

61           Figure 2.3: Percentage of HOL Teams Supporting Products at Different Lifecycle Stages (US)

62           Figure 2.4: Stage at Which HOL Teams Begin Supporting a Product (Canada and UK)

63           Figure 2.5: Stage at Which HOL Teams Stop Supporting a Product (Canada and UK)

64           Figure 2.6: Overall HOL Brand Support, by Lifecycle Stage (US)

65           Figure 2.7: Overall HOL Brand Support, by Lifecycle Stage (Canada and UK)

66           Figure 2.8: Average Percentage of Time an HOL Spends on Specific Activities (US)

67           Figure 2.9: Average Percentage of Time an HOL Spends on Specific Activities (Canada and UK)

68           Payer Interactions

70           Figure 2.10: Number of Interactions with Top-Level Payers by an HOL per Quarter (US)

71           Figure 2.11: Number of Interactions with Mid-Level Payers by an HOL per Quarter (US)

72           Figure 2.12: Number of Interactions with Low-Level Payers by an HOL per Quarter (US)

73           Figure 2.13: Average Number of Interactions by an HOL per Quarter: UK Company 26

74           Figure 2.14: Average Number of Face-to-Face Visits by an HOL per Quarter (US)

74           Figure 2.15: Average Number of Telephone Interactions by an HOL per Quarter (US)

75           Figure 2.16: Average Number of Email Exchanges by an HOL per Quarter (US)

75           Figure 2.17: Average Number of Other Engagements by an HOL per Quarter (US)

76           Figure 2.18: Average Number of HOLs Assigned to a Payer (US)

77           Figure 2.19: Average Number of HOLs Assigned to a Payer (Canada and UK)

78           Figure 2.20: Average Length of a Face-to-Face Payer Visit (US)

79           Figure 2.21: Average Length of a Face-to-Face Payer Visit (Canada and UK)

80           Figure 2.22: Average Effectiveness Ratings of Tools Used in Payer Conversations (US): Small  Molecule Drugs

82           Figure 2.23: Average Effectiveness Ratings of Tools Used in Payer Conversations (US): Biologics

83           Figure 2.24: Average Effectiveness Ratings of Tools Used in Payer Conversations (Canada and UK)

87           Working with Other Field Forces

88           Figure 2.25: Do HOLs and MSLs Call on the Same Clients? (US)

89           Figure 2.26: Ways in Which HOLs and MSLs Interact (US)

91           Building an HOL Team Through Targeted Hiring and Training

91           Figure 3.1: Percentage of Companies with an HOL Team

92           Figure 3.2: Size of Companies with Dedicated HOL Teams

93           Figure 3.3: Percentage of Companies Planning to Create a New HOL Team

94           Figure 3.4: Time Frame in Which HOL Team Will Be Implemented

95           Figure 3.5: Companies’ Ideal Education Levels for HOL Hires (US)

95           HOL Hiring and Training

96           Figure 3.6: Companies’ Ideal Education Levels of HOL Hires (Canada and UK)

97           Figure 3.7: Companies’ Ideal Education Levels of HOL Hires (US vs. Canada and UK)

98           Figure 3.8: Preferred Number of Years of Experience for HOL New Hires (US)

99           Figure 3.9: Ideal Job Experience of HOL New Hires (US): All Companies

100         Figure 3.10: Ideal Job Experience of HOL New Hires (US): Top 10 Companies

101         Figure 3.11: Ideal Job Experience of HOL New Hires (US): Top 20 Companies

102         Figure 3.12: Preferred Number of Years of Experience for HOL New Hires (Canada and UK)

103         Figure 3.13: Ideal Job Experience of HOL New Hires (Canada and UK)

104         Figure 3.14: Average HOL Compensation by Years of Experience (US)

105         Figure 3.15: Average HOL Compensation by Years of Experience (US): No Experience

106         Figure 3.16: Average HOL Compensation by Years of Experience (US): Two Years’ Experience

107         Figure 3.17: Average HOL Compensation by Years of Experience (US): Five or More Years’ Experience

108         Figure 3.18: Average HOL Compensation by Years of Experience (Canada and UK)

109         Figure 3.19: Hours of Training Provided to Newly Hired HOLs, by Training Type (US)

110         Figure 3.20: Hours of Training Provided to Newly Hired HOLs, by Training Type (Canada and UK)

111         Figure 3.21: Frequency of HOL Training (US)

112         Figure 3.22: Average Number of Hours of Ongoing Training Provided to HOLs Annually (US)

113         Figure 3.23: Frequency of HOL Training (Canada and UK)

114         Figure 3.24: Average Number of Hours of Ongoing Training Provided to HOLs Annually (Canada and UK)

115         Launching New HOL Teams to Meet Payer Demands

116         Table 3.1: Positions that Currently Fill HOL Role at Companies without an HOL Team