Global Market Access Strategies

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This study provides executives with best practices and timelines for payer relationship management.  It examines the importance of third-party perspectives in building these relationships and how payer engagement impacts product pricing and launch sequences.  Benchmarks compare year-over-year payer relationship management budgets and product pricing activities. Data were compiled from global, US and country-level teams at Top 10, Top 50 and small pharmaceutical companies.

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Report Details

This global market access report provides a comprehensive view of pharmaceutical market access teams. Benchmarks and metrics cover global market access staffing, budgets, outsourcing, structure and more. Use findings to see how companies meet payer requirements, deliver relevant data to payers, demonstrate product value at the local level, monitor competitor products, and put pieces in place for the launch puzzle.

Altogether, the report’s metrics and best practices recommend the following to help improve your company’s global market access strategy:

  • Nurture payer relationships before, during and after launch to ensure and retain global market access.
  • Dedicate unique market access strategies to each product to bring key advantages to the launch.
  • Look to health economics experts to overcome internal clients’ lack of HEOR knowledge.
  • Start core market access activities approximately 18 months before product launch.
  • Be aware of the growth and importance of population health management.

Data have been split by team region:

  • Global
  • United States
  • Emerging Markets
  • Canada
  • Europe

Data have also been split by company size:

  • Top 10
  • Top 50
  • Small

Top Reasons to Buy this Global Market Access Strategies Report

Strengthen payer relationship management: Payer relationship management remains the centerpiece of most pharmaceutical market access teams. Drug companies must support these relationships with valuable health economics and pricing research. This study includes insights and data on how market access teams develop and deliver relevant and useful data to enhance payer relationships.
Demonstrate product value at a local level: Pharmaceutical companies must demonstrate the value of products in each individual market by combining market access expertise with health economics, patient-reported outcomes and regulatory affairs. This study provides market access teams with a successful strategy for cross-functional coordination that allows them to develop, distribute and support product value stories.

Develop a launch plan at least 24 months before launch: A successful product launch requires a well-established launch sequencing strategy and the expertise of many in-house functions. However, market access teams often provide a foundation for launch sequencing preparations by connecting with local regulatory authorities, payers and physicians, well ahead of product launch. The data in this study provide launch decision details, timelines and other metrics to help market access teams implement and plan successful launches and launch sequences.

You may also be interested in our market access library as well as our individual market access research reports.

 

The following excerpt is from Chapter 2, Calibrate Spending and Outsourcing to Meet Market Needs.

Companies consider a number of key variables when setting budgets for market access functions. Health economic team reporting structures can have a significant impact on market access budgets. HEOR teams at many companies now report into — and are funded by — medical affairs teams. On one hand, this structure can reduce the direct budgetary burden on market access teams when it comes to funding these activities. On the other hand, it can also limit their scope of influence in how research is being guided.

Another major budget factor is the expected reach of payer engagement teams. Payer engagement teams at companies with highly specialized products may have fewer external stakeholders they can talk to than teams with blockbuster products. Specialty products also require managed markets account managers be able to communicate complex economic and pharmacological concepts to payers. Typically, field forces with these specialized skills come at a premium in terms of salary and benefits.

Total Market Access Budgets Increasing for Most Companies 

For surveyed Top 10 company teams, overall market access spending averages around $9 million per year (Figure 2.1). These large teams are typically supporting much larger product portfolios. As a result, large portfolios require proportionally larger investments in outcomes research and payer engagement.

Figure 2.1 (figure not shown) shows that there is a much smaller difference between Top 50 and small pharmaceutical company teams. Overall, surveyed Top 50 teams averaged $1.9 million in spending in 2015. By comparison, surveyed small companies reported $2.1 million in market access spending that year. These findings demonstrate the significant drop in spending that occurs as product portfolios decrease in size.

Examples of Companies that Have Participated in this Study:

ph223-company-list

Table of Contents

8             Executive Summary

19           Market Access Team Structure and Staffing

27           Responsibility for Market Access Activities

33           Appropriate Sizing and Structure of Market Access Teams

44           Calibrate Spending and Outsourcing to Meet Market Needs

45           Overall Market Access Spending on the Rise

52           Market Access Subfunction spending Highlights importance of HEOR

64           Market Access Outsourcing Fills Key Gaps in Internal Capabilities

68           Build Payer Relationships Early to Facilitate Customized Pricing and Launch Sequencing Strategies

70           Forge Strong Payer Relationships by Incorporating Third-Party Perspectives

89           Constantly Communicate with Third-Party Stakeholders to Develop and Uphold Pricing Strategies

97           Plan Early to Develop Customized Launch Sequences

106        Broaden Patient-Centric Strategies with a Dedicated Population Health Management Team

110         Combining Market Access Expertise with Health Economics, Patient-Reported Outcomes and Regulatory Affairs

112        Leveraging Market Access Teams to Support health Economics efforts

135        Harnessing Market Access Expertise to Drive Patient-Reported Outcomes Activities

139        Looking to Medical Science Liaisons and Regulatory Affairs Teams to Aid Market Access

144        Market Access Team Strategy and Success

CHARTS AND GRAPHICS

8             Executive Summary

9              Figure E.1: Percentage of Budget and FTEs Allocated to Market Access Administration and Payer Relationships

11           Figure E.2: Approach to Developing Market Access Strategy: All Companies

12           Figure E.3: Companies’ Rating for Market Access Challenge: Overcoming Lack of HEOR Knowledge by Internal Groups

13           Figure E.4: Current and Ideal Starts of Market Access Activities Relative to Launch: All Companies

15           Figure E.5: Management of Population Health Management Activities, by Company Size

18           Market Access Team Structure and Staffing

19           Figure 1.1: Market Access Team Involvement, by Subfunction: All Companies

20           Figure 1.2: Market Access Team Involvement, by Subfunction and Company Type

20           Figure 1.3: Market Access Team Involvement, by Subfunction and Region

21           Figure 1.4: Current Start of Market Access Subfunctions Relative to Launch: Top 10 Companies

22           Figure 1.5: Ideal Start of Market Access Activities Subfunctions to Launch: Top 10 Companies

23           Figure 1.6: Current Start of Market Access Subfunctions Relative to Launch: Top 50 Companies

23           Figure 1.7: Ideal Start of Market Access Activities Subfunctions to Launch: Top 50 Companies

24           Figure 1.8: Current Start of Market Access Subfunctions Relative to Launch: Small Pharma

25           Figure 1.9: Ideal Start of Market Access Subfunctions Relative to Launch: Small Pharma

26           Figure 1.10: Functional Responsibility for Market Access Activities: All Teams

26           Responsibility for Market Access Activities

27           Figure 1.11: Final Oversight of Market Access Activities: All Teams

28           Figure 1.12: Level of Executive Leading Market Access Group: All Teams

28           Figure 1.13: Level of Executive Leading Market Access Group, by Company Type

29           Figure 1.14: Level of Executive Leading Market Access Group, by Region

30           Figure 1.15: Level of Executive with Final Oversight over Market Access Function: All Teams

31           Figure 1.16: Level of Executive with Final Oversight over Market Access Function, by Company Type

31           Figure 1.17: Level of Executive with Final Oversight over Market Access Function, by Region

32           Appropriate Sizing and Structure of Market Access Teams

33           Figure 1.18: Prototypical Market Access Team Structure and FTE Allocation: Top 10 Companies

33           Figure 1.19: Prototypical Market Access Team Structure and FTE Allocation: Top 50 Companies

34           Figure 1.20: Prototypical Market Access Team Structure and FTE Allocation: Small Companies

35           Figure 1.21: Prototypical Market Access Team Structure and FTE Allocation: US Teams

36           Figure 1.22: Prototypical Market Access Team Structure and FTE Allocation: EU/Canada Teams

36           Figure 1.23: Prototypical Market Access Team Structure and FTE Allocation: Emerging Markets Teams

37           Figure 1.24: Average Total Number of Market Access FTEs, by Company Type

38           Figure 1.25: Average Total Number of Market Access FTEs, by Region

39           Figure 1.26: Average Number of FTEs for Market Access Subfunctions: Top 10 Companies

39           Figure 1.27: Average Number of FTEs for Market Access Subfunctions: Top 50 Companies

40           Figure 1.28: Average Number of FTEs for Market Access Subfunctions: Small Companies

41           Figure 1.29: Average Number of FTEs for Market Access Subfunctions: US Teams

42           Figure 1.30: Average Number of FTEs for Market Access Subfunctions: EU/Canada Teams

42           Figure 1.31: Average Number of FTEs for Market Access Subfunctions: Emerging Markets Teams

43           Calibrate Spending and Outsourcing to Meet Market Needs

44           Overall Market Access Spending on the Rise

45           Figure 2.1: Average Annual Market Access Spending, by Company Type

46           Figure 2.2: Average Annual Market Access Spending, by Team Region

47           Figure 2.3: Annual Market Access Spending, by Company: Top 10 Companies

48           Figure 2.4: Annual Market Access Spending, by Company: Top 50 Companies

48           Figure 2.5: Annual Market Access Spending, by Company: Small Companies

49           Figure 2.6: Percentage of Annual Spending Dedicated to Overhead/Salaries, by Company

50           Figure 2.7: Annual Spending Dedicated to Overhead/Salaries, by Company

51           Figure 2.8: Budget and FTE Allocation for Market Access Subfunctions

51           Market Access Subfunction Spending Highlights Importance of HEOR

52           Figure 2.9: Market Access Budget Allocation, by Company Type

53           Figure 2.10: Average Budget Allocations for Market Access Subfunctions: Top 10 Companies

54           Figure 2.11: Average Budget Allocations for Market Access Subfunctions: Top 50 Companies

54           Figure 2.12: Average Budget Allocations for Market Access Subfunctions: Small Companies

55           Figure 2.13: Average Budget Allocations for Market Access Subfunctions, by Team Region

56           Figure 2.14: Average Budget Allocations for Market Access Subfunctions: US Teams

57           Figure 2.15: Average Budget Allocations for Market Access Subfunctions: EU/Canada Teams

57           Figure 2.16: Average Budget Allocations for Market Access Subfunctions: Emerging Markets Teams

58           Figure 2.17: Changes in Budgets for Market Access Subfunctions from 2015 to 2016: Strategy/ Administration

59           Figure 2.18: Changes in Budgets for Market Access Subfunctions from 2015 to 2016: Payer Relationships

60           Figure 2.19: Changes in Budgets for Market Access Subfunctions from 2015 to 2016: HEOR

60           Figure 2.20: Changes in Budgets for Market Access Subfunctions from 2015 to 2016: CER

61           Figure 2.21: Changes in Budgets for Market Access Subfunctions from 2015 to 2016: Product Pricing

62           Figure 2.22: Changes in Budgets for Market Access Subfunctions from 2015 to 2016: Patient Reported Outcomes

62           Figure 2.23: Changes in Budgets for Market Access Subfunctions from 2015 to 2016: Launch Sequencing

63           Figure 2.24: Outsourcing of Market Access Activities, by Subfunction: All Teams

63           Market Access Outsourcing Fills KEy Gaps in Internal Capabilities

64           Figure 2.25: Percentage of Market Access Admin/Strategy Activity and Spending Outsourced, by Company

65           Figure 2.26: Percentage of Product Pricing Activity and Spending Outsourced, by Company

65           Figure 2.27: Percentage of Health Economics Activity and Spending Outsourced, by Company

66           Figure 2.28: Percentage of Comparative Effectiveness Research Activity and Spending Outsourced, by Company

66           Figure 2.29: Percentage of Launch Sequencing Activity and Spending Outsourced, by Company

67           Build Payer Relationships Early to Facilitate Customized Pricing and Launch Sequencing Strategies

69           Forge Strong Payer Relationships by Incorporating Third-Party Perspectives

71           Figure 3.1: Percentage of Market Access Groups Involved in Payer Relationships, by Company Size

72           Figure 3.2: Percentage of Market Access Groups Involved in Payer Relationships, by Team Region

74           Figure 3.3: Number of Months Before or After Product Launch for Start of Payer Relationships Activities, by Company Size

75           Figure 3.4: 2015 Budget for Payer Relationship Activities: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies

76           Figure 3.5: 2015 Budget for Payer Relationship Activities: Small Companies

77           Figure 3.6: Changes in Payer Relationship Budget Between 2015 and 2016

78           Figure 3.7: Percentage of Companies Employing Managed Market Account Managers, by Account Manager Type

79           Figure 3.8: Percentage of Companies Employing Managed Market Account Managers, by Account Manager Type and Company Size

80           Figure 3.9: Percentage of Companies Employing Managed Market Account Managers, by Account Manager Type and Team Region

81           Figure 3.10: Number of National- and State-level Account Managers: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies

82           Figure 3.11: Number of National- and State-level Account Managers: Small Companies

83           Figure 3.12: Number of Government Account Managers: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies

84           Figure 3.13: Number of Government Account Managers: Small Companies

84           Figure 3.14: Number of Pharmacy Account Managers: All Companies

86           Figure 3.15: Total Annual Cost of National- and State-level Account Managers: All Teams

87           Figure 3.16: Total Annual Cost of Government Account Managers: All Teams

87           Figure 3.17: Total Annual Cost of Pharmacy Account Managers: All Teams

88           Constantly Communicate with Third-Party Stakeholders to Develop and Uphold Pricing Strategies

90           Figure 3.18: Percentage of Market Access Groups Involved in Product Pricing, by Company Size

91           Figure 3.19: Percentage of Market Access Groups Involved in Product Pricing, by Team Region

93           Figure 3.20: Number of Months Before or After Launch for Start of Product Pricing Activities, by Company Size

94           Figure 3.21: 2015 Budget for Product Pricing Activities: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies

94           Figure 3.22: 2015 Budget for Product Pricing Activities: Small Companies

95           Figure 3.23: Changes in Product Pricing Budget Between 2015 and 2016

96           Plan Early to Develop Customized Launch Sequences

97           Figure 3.24: Percentage of Market Access Groups Involved in Launch Sequencing, by Company Size

97           Figure 3.25: Percentage of Market Access Groups Involved in Launch Sequencing, by Team Region

98           Figure 3.26: Number of Months Before or After Launch for Start of Launch Sequencing Activities, by Company Size

99           Figure 3.27: 2015 Budget for Launch Sequencing Activities: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies

100        Figure 3.28: 2015 Budget for Launch Sequencing Activities: Small Companies

101        Figure 3.29: Changes in Launch Sequencing Budget Between 2015 and 2016

102        Figure 3.30: Management of Launch Sequencing Activities: All Teams

102        Figure 3.31: Management of Launch Sequencing Responsibilities, by Company Size

103        Figure 3.32: Design of Product Launch Sequences: All Teams

104        Figure 3.33: Design of Product Launch Sequences, by Company Size

105        Broaden Patient-Centric Strategies with A Dedicated Population Health Management Team

106        Figure 3.34: Management of Population Health Management Activities: All Teams

107        Figure 3.35: Management of Population Health Management Activities, by Company Size

108        Figure 3.36: Group with Oversight of Population Health Management Activities: All Teams

109        Combining Market Access Expertise with Health Economics, Patient-Reported Outcomes and Regulatory Affairs

111        Leveraging Market Access Teams to Support Health Economics Efforts

113        Figure 4.1: Role of Managed Markets Account Managers in Developing and Disseminating Health Economics Data: All Teams

114        Figure 4.2: Role of Medical Science Liaisons in Developing and Disseminating Health Economics Data: All Teams

115        Figure 4.3: Role of Health Outcomes Liaisons in Developing and Disseminating Health Economics Data: All Teams

116        Figure 4.4: Role of Health Economists in Developing and Disseminating Health Economics Data: All Teams

144        Figure 5.1: Approach to Developing Market Access Strategy: All Teams

144        Figure 5.2: Approach to Developing Market Access Strategy, by Company Type

145        Figure 5.3: Functional Involvement in Developing Market Access Strategy: All Teams

146        Figure 5.4: Functional Involvement in Developing Market Access Strategy, by Company Type

147        Figure 5.5: Functional Involvement in Developing Market Access Strategy, by Team Region

148        Figure 5.6: Market Changes Prompting Market Access Strategy Reassessment

149        Figure 5.7: Market Changes Prompting Market Access Strategy Reassessment, by Company Type

150        Figure 5.8: Market Changes Prompting Market Access Strategy Reassessment, by Region

151        Figure 5.9: Percentage of Companies Evaluating Market Access Success, by Metric: All Teams

152        Figure 5.10: Challenges Facing Marketing Access Teams: All Teams

154        Figure 5.11: Trends Facing Marketing Access Teams: All Teams