Determining Physician Fair Market Value for Specialist Thought Leaders

Victoria Cavicchi, pharmaceutical social media researcher
By Victoria Cavicchi,
Senior Research Analyst

When determining physician fair market value, life sciences organizations must consider a number of factors, including the doctor’s specialty area, geography and level of expertise.  As firms work to determine fair market value and standardize rate cards, they must also decide physician segmentation criteria.  Many firms look to three-tier segmentation systems to distinguish KOL compensation.  Continue reading


How Are Pharma Companies Using the US Sunshine Act to Prepare for Other Transparency Regulations?

Victoria Cavicchi, pharmaceutical social media researcher
By Victoria Cavicchi,
Research Analyst

With the US Sunshine Act finalized in 2013, life sciences organizations are increasingly aware of how this mandate impacts their day-to-day activities.  Now with multiple years of practice with this regulation under their collective belts, companies are typically comfortable tracking their payments to physicians and teaching hospitals.  However, physician payment reporting does not end with the Sunshine Act. Continue reading


Physician Fair Market Value: The Value of Formalized Rate Cards

Victoria Cavicchi, pharmaceutical social media researcher
By Victoria Cavicchi,
Research Analyst

The life sciences industry is seeing more and more transparency regarding physician payment.  The US Physician Payment Sunshine Act, requiring pharmaceutical companies to report all payments, was finalized in 2013.  Meanwhile, France has passed the Loi Bertrand, which imposes similar reporting requirements to the Sunshine Act; other companies, including Slovakia and Columbia, has followed suit. Still others are planning to implement their own payment reporting legislation.  To prepare for and adhere to these many companies look to formalized rate cards to standardize their payment processes. Continue reading


Changes to Sunshine Act Reporting Requirements Coming Soon?

Sarah Ray, regulatory affairs and safety researcher
By Sarah Ray,
Senior Research Analyst

The Medicare Payments Advisory Commission (MedPAC) is a 17-person-strong, independent agency that apprises Congress of issues affecting the US Medicare program.  Back in 2008, the group played an instrumental role in the formation of the Sunshine Act aspect of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Since then, the group continues to track Open Payments outcomes and propose recommendations to Congress.  Continue reading


Where Are Physician Payments Going? A Look At Potomac River Partners’ 2014 CMS Data Analysis

Victoria Cavicchi, pharmaceutical social media researcher
By Victoria Cavicchi,
Research Analyst

Key opinion leaders and physician experts have a long-standing tradition of working with pharmaceutical and medical device companies to further mutually beneficial goals.  These goals and activities often include research and continuing medical education.  With the US Sunshine Act firmly in place, we can see more clearly how the life sciences manufacturers interact with KOLs and allocate physician payments.  Continue reading


Recent Rate Card Sampling Shows Life Science Teams Reimburse KOLs at Similar Rates

Sarah Ray, regulatory affairs and safety researcher
By Sarah Ray,
Senior Research Analyst

Life science teams enact a number of strategies to assure fair market value (FMV) rates when compensating industry key opinion leaders (KOLs).  The rate card that these pharmaceutical and device teams develop include payment ranges for advisory board and speaker programs, among other medical affairs activities.  In some cases, these rates are determined on an hourly basis.  In others, rates are capped at a pre-determined maximum, flat rate.  Continue reading


Female Key Opinion Leaders Receive Smaller Percentage of Research Funding, Finds Recent Cleveland Clinic Study

Sarah Ray, regulatory affairs and safety researcher
By Sarah Ray,
Senior Research Analyst

Over the past few years, the industry has paid close attention to the Sunshine Act’s physician payment reporting requirements.  Ideally, publication of payment data will usher in a new era of transparency regarding how key opinion leaders (KOLs) interact with life science teams.  However, while many healthcare consumers may welcome Sunshine Act reporting, some physicians and industry groups remain apprehensive that consumers will take financial information out of context.  Moreover, previously released physician payment data already demonstrates that individuals may not always receive equivalent compensation for the same types of work. Continue reading



Can’t Reach Physicians? Time to Implement Customer-Centric Strategies

Victoria Cavicchi, pharmaceutical social media researcher
By Victoria Cavicchi,
Research Analyst

In recent years, pharmaceutical companies’ commercial teams have faced a growing number of challenges in the market.  These organizations have already faced two major patent cliffs, both of which filled the market with a number of generics and biosimilars alongside an increasing contingent of branded competitors.  Now, sales representatives are seeing more and more doctors close their doors to pharma’s commercial forces in response to the Physician Payment Sunshine Act.  In the wake of these challenges, pharmaceutical sales teams have had to evolve their traditionally product-centered commercial models to better meet their customers’ demands. Continue reading


The Sunshine is Spreading: Physician Payment Reporting Obligations Have Become a Global Affair

Sarah Ray, regulatory affairs and safety researcher
By Sarah Ray,
Senior Research Analyst

The US Sunshine Act is probably among the more well-known regulations governing the life science industry’s interactions with physicians and other healthcare community members.  However, when it comes to physician payment reporting obligations, the United States is not the only country with a little sunshine to spare. Many other countries have also recently drafted or enacted physician payment disclosure requirements of their own. Continue reading