Pharmaceutical New Product Planning (PH176)

Building the Framework for Brand Commercialization
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  • Give Commercial Voice to Developing Brands

    Facing a fiercely competitive landscape and stringent payer demands, life science companies start shaping the commercial profiles of their emerging brands as early as possible.  Throughout development, new product planning groups provide a critical commercial perspective — and their assessments, forecasting and insights influence critical go/no-go decisions at every step. 

    When well-structured and adequately resourced, new product planning groups influence a range of commercialization activities for brands advancing through development.  This report’s benchmarks explore new product planning team resources, structures and responsibilities, as well as new product planning support for individual products. 

     

    Build an elite new product planning team — and justify team budgets

    Compare department spending and staffing levels for 2011 and 2012, as well as the number of brands supported by new product planning groups.  Examine salary and bonus compensation for four levels of team staffing, and explore team structures for small and large companies.  Along the way, learn top-performing companies’ strategies for ensuring adequate budgets — a significant challenge for new product planning teams.

     

    Define team responsibilities and prioritize workload

    During their early commercialization efforts, new product planning teams support clinical and R&D groups while playing critical roles in business development.  Track high-priority new product planning activities across early, middle and late commercialization stages, and facilitate the transition of brand responsibilities among teams.

     

    Grow new product planning resources to match brand commercialization requirements

    In addition to showing department-level resources, this report details new product planning staffing, budgets and activities for single brands.  Compare resource metrics for 9 individual, developing brands from pre-clinical testing to Phase 3, and track key new product planning budget allocations in each time frame.

     

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  • New Product Planning Metrics

     

    Chapter 1: New Product Planning Structure and Department-Level Resources

    Chapter Benefits

    • Build dedicated new product planning teams to support developing brands and serve as brands’ early commercial voice.
    • Compare ideal new product planning backgrounds and education levels to staff a strong team.
    • Overcome budget challenges to support new product planning efforts for promising brands
    • Demonstrate team value — and defend proposed new product planning budgets — by showing how new product planning teams maximize product worth.
    • Balance in-house work and outsourcing by hiring skilled internal new product planning team members.
    • Prioritize new product planning efforts to best manage resource gaps.

     

    Chapter Data

    31 charts showing high-level new product planning team structure, staffing and spending.  Many figures broken out by company are also broken out by company type.  Company types are divided between large companies and business unit-level teams; and mid-sized and small companies with corporate-level teams.

    • Percentage of companies with dedicated new product planning teams
    • Age of new product planning teams in years (by company)
    • Types of new product planning teams in place (centralized, geographic, or therapeutic area-aligned teams)
    • Therapeutic areas covered by new product planning teams
    • Diagram of new product planning team leadership and reporting lines
    • Three real-world examples of new product planning teams
    • New product planning team staffing (by company and company type)
    • Number of brands currently covered by new product planning (by company and company type)
    • Highest/lowest numbers of developing brands managed by new product planning between 2007 and 2012 (by company and company type)
    • Number of managed brands per new product planning FTE (by company and company type)
    • Average compensation across new product planning staffing levels (senior directors, directors, senior managers and managers)
    • Highest education levels attained by new product planning executives (vice presidents, senior directors, directors, senior managers and managers)
    • Ideal educational backgrounds for new product planning staff
    • Ratings of new product planning challenges
    • Type of budget supporting new product planning (dedicated, dedicated with additional contributions from other groups, or non-dedicated budgets)
    • New product planning team 2011 and 2012 budgets (by company and company type)
    • Sources of new product planning spending
    • High-level new product planning budget allocation
    • Percentage of new product planning spending outsourced (by company)

     

    Chapter 2: Positioning Emerging Brands for Commercial Success

    Chapter Benefits

    • Encourage internal communication between groups performing early commercialization to better transition and balance developing brand responsibilities.
    • Leverage new product planning liaisons to make transitioning brand responsibilities easier during late-stage development.
    • Insert additional, commercial-focused endpoints into clinical trials by selecting appropriate comparators and compiling HEOR data before reimbursement discussions.
    • Use new product planning teams to support business development objectives and provide an unbiased perspective when evaluating potential partnerships.
    • Leverage new product planning teams’ commercial and scientific backgrounds to assess pipeline products’ marketability and competitive aspects.

     

    Chapter Data

    44 charts showing new product planning activities in support of developing brands during early-, mid- and late-development stages, as well as business development efforts.

    • Development stages at which new product planning teams are involved with developing brands (by company)
    • Development stage at which product planning teams become involved with developing brands
    • Diagrams of three real-company examples: transitioning brand commercialization to new product planning teams and to in-line marketing teams
    • Importance ratings of specific earliest, early-, mid- and late-development activities for new product planning teams’ brand commercialization
    • Stages at new product planning teams perform the earliest commercialization activities (by company):
      • Develop views of unmet needs
      • Perform a disease state initial assessment
      • Develop an initial assessment of the competitive landscape
      • Develop an initial forecast of market potential
    • Stages at new product planning teams perform the early commercialization activities (by company):
      • Perform target product profile development
      • Develop full assessments of the competitive landscape
      • Develop a forecast of market potential
      • Develop disease state opportunity assessment
      • Develop commercial risks assessment
      • Develop non-proprietary naming
    • Stages at new product planning teams perform mid-development early brand commercialization activities (by company):
      • Develop market access planning
      • Work with advisory boards
      • Perform HEOR
      • Work on positioning development
      • Develop publications strategies
      • Work on thought leader development
      • Work on advocacy development
      • Develop preliminary labeling
      • Set medical meetings strategies
      • Develop lifecycle strategy development
      • Perform epidemiology research
    • Stages at new product planning teams perform late-development early brand commercialization activities, by company:
      • Develop labeling
      • Work on pricing
      • Develop marketing messaging
      • Develop disease state educational activities
      • Develop positioning
      • Develop physician segmentation
      • Finalize brand naming
      • Develop patient segmentation
      • Develop packaging
    • Phase at which new product planning teams hand off responsibility for developing brands
    • Percentage of new product planning teams playing a role in business development
    • Percentage of new product planning teams dedicated to business development-related efforts
    • Percentage of new product planning teams performing specific business development activities 

     

    Chapter 3: Phase-by-Phase New Product Planning Spending and Staffing for Developing Brands

    Chapter Benefits

    • Track nine companies’ individual brand examples’ resources from early development through Phase 3 testing. 
    • Metrics measure:
      • New product planning headcount per brand
      • New product planning budget per brand
      • Brand budget allocation
      • Percentage of new product planning brand budget spent per specific new product planning activity
    • Compare spending and staffing resources for individual brands in pre-clinical testing, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3
    • Prepare new product planning teams to manage and complete a growing number of activities as brands move closer to launch
    • Support increasing new product planning responsibilities with increasing budgets and headcounts.

     

    Chapter Data

    48 charts showing new product planning teams’ efforts to support a single brand from pre-clinical testing to Phase 3.

    • New product planning headcounts and budgets supporting a developing brand during pre-clinical testing, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3
    • Allocation of new product planning budgets supporting a developing brand during pre-clinical testing, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3
    • Percentage of individual pre-clinical new product planning brand budgets allocated to specific activities (by company):
      • Developing view of unmet needs
      • Performing an initial forecast of market potential
      • Performing an initial assessment of the competitive landscape
      • Performing an initial assessment of the disease state
    • Percentage of individual Phase 1 new product planning brand budgets allocated to specific activities (by company):
      • Target product profile development
      • Developing a forecast of market potential
      • Performing a competitive landscape assessment
      • Performing non-proprietary naming work
      • Performing a commercial risks assessment
      • Performing a disease state opportunity assessment
    • Percentage of individual Phase 2 new product planning brand budgets allocated to specific activities (by company):
      • Thought leader development
      • Advisory boards
      • Market access planning
      • Preliminary labeling
      • Epidemiology work
      • Publications strategy development
      • Positioning development
      • Advocacy development
      • HEOR
      • Setting medical meetings strategies
      • Lifecycle strategy development
    • Percentage of individual Phase 3 new product planning brand budgets allocated to specific activities (by company):
      • Market Messaging development
      • Labeling
      • Physician segmentation
      • Patient segmentation
      • Positioning
      • Pricing
      • Finalizing brand naming
      • Packaging development
      • Publication strategy development
      • Advocacy development
      • Disease state educational activities
      • HEOR

       

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  • New Product Planning Excerpt

     

    The following excerpt is a key finding from the full report’s Executive Summary:

     

    Work with Clinical Teams to Insert Commercially Focused Data Collection into Clinical Trials

    Ideally, new product planning teams insert commercially and/or market access-focused data collection into the clinical trials of the brands that they support. Commercially focused data, typically concerning patient outcomes, help shape products’ final commercial profiles. The data also provide payers with information that they now often require prior to granting products reimbursement status.

    Overall, new product planning teams are pushing for increased influence over a product’s early clinical development. Although teams may face resistance from R&D, implementing commercial factors into early clinical trials is critical. Laying the groundwork for the commercial future of compounds proves beneficial, especially as companies begin applying for reimbursement.

    New product planning teams face roadblocks getting extra data collection into trials, however. The largest roadblocks are R&D’s extremely tight timelines and their laser focus on more traditional regulatory-facing trial endpoints and data collection. Still, several new product planning groups do successfully collaborate with clinical development teams to shape trials to benefit developing brands commercially.

    At one surveyed company, for example, new product planning provides continuous feedback to clinical teams. Here, new product planning works closely with clinical teams to scope out and insert additional data collection into trials when possible.  New product planning’s HEOR-based questions pay dividends for the company in later discussions with payers once brands reach market.

    At another surveyed company, endorsement from top-level management helps new product planning influence trials in a way that aids in products’ commercialization. The team works hand-in-hand with clinical groups to uncover what they can add to the trials to get market authorization, market access and also market differentiation.

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