By Jacob Presson,
Senior Research Analyst

One of the interesting trends over the past few years for those of us watching the pharmaceutical industry is how companies are turning increasingly to specialization within their portfolios. Pharmaceutical divestitures are continuing at breakneck pace as companies look to shed products that fall outside primary business interests and scour the market for products or pipelines that match up with development priorities.  So why is this happening now and how will it further shape the industry? Continue reading “Pharmaceutical Divestitures Are Reshaping the Pharma Landscape” »


By Sarah Ray,

Senior Research Analyst

According to a Cutting Edge Information study, attaining favorable Medicaid pricing remains a key factor in life science companies’ market access preparations.  Broadly, government payer acceptance often sets the precedent for whether private payers will reimburse company products or not. Unsurprisingly, private payers are less likely to support products that fail to meet government approval. As one market access advisor explained, “Failure to receive Medicaid coverage is like a kiss of death for company products.”  Subsequently, market access teams work diligently to ensure that drugs attain Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement. Continue reading “Leverage Multiple Groups To Support Medicaid Pricing Activities” »


By Natalie DeMasi,
Research Analyst

One of the best ways to prove a product’s worth is to quash a competing product in comparative effectiveness research (CER) clinical trials.  Conversely, one of the best ways to harm a product’s market success is to be crushed in a comparator trial.  Of course, most CER clinical trials are not this definitive — but there are always risks.  Despite this, many life sciences companies look to comparative effectiveness findings to aid market access and commercialization processes. Continue reading “Mitigating the Risks of CER Clinical Trials” »


By Victoria Cavicchi,
Research Analyst

Risk-based monitoring (RBM) has recently emerged in the pharmaceutical industry as a way to reduce the costs of clinical trials while maintaining, or even improving, site protocol compliance and communication. In traditional trials, sponsors visit clinical sites frequently — often every four to eight weeks. However, these in-person site visits and monitoring strategies account for a large percentage—a suggested 30% — of clinical trial costs.  A risk-based monitoring strategy — especially when combined with in-person visits — conserves time and staffing resources while still enforcing good clinical practices. Continue reading “Risk-Based Monitoring Strategy: Embrace Centralization Technology to Save Resources During Clinical Trials” »


By Sarah Ray,Senior Research Analyst

The foresight necessary to produce clinical publications is similar to preparing for and running a marathon. Before the race begins — or before a product launches — a lot of hard work goes into ensuring that the final outcome matches the desired result.  Runners may train for weeks, months or even years to prepare themselves for an upcoming competition. In similar fashion, dedicated publications teams spend a lot of time ensuring that products will receive ample clinical publications support both before and after product launch. Continue reading “Setting the Pace for Clinical Publications, One Step at a Time” »


By Natalie DeMasi,
Research Analyst

The key to managing payer relationships lies in Thomas Jefferson’s old adage:  “I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”  Like Jefferson, managed markets account managers must make their own luck when they meet with payers by preparing beforehand. Continue reading “Managing Payer Relationships: Making Your Own Luck by Planning and Strategizing” »


By Jacob Presson,
Senior Research Analyst

Pharmaceutical companies’ medical information groups often use outsourced call centers to support their activities.  As such, keeping close track of the performance of these vendors has grown in importance.  Many medical information groups have a set list of performance indicators paired with internal goals that must be met to ensure a consistent experience for callers.  Pharmaceutical call center audits, in their various forms, allow companies to monitor vendors with the same level of detail that they would be able to do for an in-house team. Continue reading “Staying in the Loop: Pharmaceutical Call Center Audits” »


By Victoria Cavicchi,
Research Analyst

Because of patient-reported outcomes’ implications for market access and reimbursement success, many pharmaceutical organizations include these endpoints during clinical trials.  However, these clinical outcomes assessments are not always an option for clinical teams. Certain patients — typically small children and, sometimes, patients suffering from illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease — are unable to manage their own outcomes reporting during trials. In these cases, clinical teams can look to caregivers or clinicians to submit observer-reported outcomes (ObsROs) or clinician-reported outcomes (ClinROs) to provide patient-centric insights. Continue reading “Patients Can’t Answer? Look to Clinician- or Observer-Reported Outcomes!” »

Investigator meetings engage, educate and synchronize investigators before a clinical trial begins.  These meetings may have been extravagant in the 1990’s, but increased physician-pharma interaction regulations now monitor how much money companies spend on investigator meeting budgets.  To avoid compliance troubles, investigator meetings should be comfortable but not ostentatious. Continue reading “So You Wanna Build an Investigator Meeting Budget?” »


By Sarah Ray,
Senior Research Analyst

When it comes to lifecycle management, providing adequate pharma new product planning support can represent a tall order.  According to the Journal of Medical Marketing, drug development takes between 12 and 15 years. Considering that patents generally only guarantee exclusivity for 20 years, companies have only 5 to 8 years of patent protection if the product makes it to market.  The same Journal of Medical Marketing article suggests that the odds of a compound in pre-clinical development ever reaching the marketplace are only 1 in 10,000. Continue reading “New Product Planning: Taking the Extra Step Now May Mean a Leap in Commercial and Reimbursement Success Later” »